in the press

'WHAT'S NEEDED NOW'

Salon's Noah Charney ponders funding for the arts in a Trump administration. Switzer weighs in: “What’s needed now isn’t more artwork that feeds the market ... We need work that tears down walls and trespasses across boundaries — work that truly changes us, and reminds us who we can be on our best days."

 
Credit: Getty/Alex Wong/Mireia Triguero Roura

Credit: Getty/Alex Wong/Mireia Triguero Roura

 

HOMETOWN LOVE FOR P&P

A double dose of hometown love for Grand Arts and P&P via CJ Janovy, at KCUR, and James Martin, for KC Studio. "Problems and Provocations provides powerful testimony," writes Martin, "that when an organization truly possesses the will and the resources to say yes to artists, amazing things can happen.”

 
 

GRAND ARTS: 'OPTIMISTIC,' 'REVOLUTIONARY'

On the International Sculpture Center blog, Jan Garden Castro revisits a 2002 interaction with Grand Arts — and advocates for the vision it set forth: "I didn’t realize until I read this book how messy and blindly optimistic Grand Arts was to commission work as revolutionary as Cronin’s Memorial and Sanford Biggers’ Blossom ... Problems and Provocations offers a free-thinking model for artists and arts foundations — one far beyond support money and/or space."

 
Rosemarie Fiore, process view,  Scrambler Drawing , 2004. Acrylic on vinyl, 60 x 60 ft.

Rosemarie Fiore, process view, Scrambler Drawing, 2004. Acrylic on vinyl, 60 x 60 ft.

 

LA REVIEW OF BOOKS ON P&P

"How, then,” asks Alina Cohen for Los Angeles Review of Books, "does a group of people who facilitated the purchase of an amusement park ride, wrangled with the State Department and the Federal Reserve, and created their own dictionary launch a book and reinvigorate the tired panel discussion format?” She came to our New York book launch last month to find out

 
Photography by Donald Stahl. Image courtesy of Red Bull Studios New York.

Photography by Donald Stahl. Image courtesy of Red Bull Studios New York.

 

'MORE RADICAL THAN MANY OF ITS PEERS'

Vice’s culture platform Creators considers Grand Arts’ legacy, in advance of Problems and Provocations' September publication. "Grand Arts served as a platform for discovery as well as production,” writes Kat Herriman. "More radical than many of its peers, the progressive institution opened their umbrella, welcoming initiatives pertaining to science, technology and social justice underneath.” 

 
Filip Noterdaeme, Florence Coyote, 2006. Photo: Russell Gera

Filip Noterdaeme, Florence Coyote, 2006. Photo: Russell Gera